Internships

Internships

The internship program of the Middle East Office of the Heinrich Böll Stiftung (hbs) welcomes interns who have a special interest in one or several hbs program areas. The internship program intends to provide an opportunity for students and young researchers to get hand-on practical experience in the field of international development work. Interns will learn about hbs activities, gain practical work and research experience, and / or make use of this opportunity for their degree dissertation. At the same time interns are expected to contribute to hbs activities with their knowledge and ideas. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Lebanon is an interesting but also a challenging environment. For reasons partly related to the volatile political situation, the Middle East Office internship program strongly encourages applicants to familiarize themselves with the challenges of an extended stay in such an environment prior to submitting an application. Applicants should highlight any previous experience in living in similarly challenging conditions. 

Who would be the best candidate for an internship with the Heinrich Böll Stiftung?

Advanced students with a study focus and research interest in hbs program areas are ideal candidates. This includes students of political, social and environmental sciences, economics, law, media, cultural and area studies. Local and international students are equally eligible for an internship.

Applicants should propose a research activity or project which they would like to pursue during the internship related to hbs’ programmatic focus areas. Our team will be happy to discuss proposed research ideas and projects, lend support through contacts and information, and potentially incorporate aspects of such a project into our program once your application has been accepted.

What types of documentation and information should be included in an application?

The application should consist of the following documents: 
• Cover letter.
• Curriculum Vitae (maximum 2 pages)
• Research Proposal (maximum 2 pages, please download format here)

The cover letter should include summary background information on the applicant. More importantly, it must contain an explanation of the applicant’s motivation for an internship with hbs and it must highlight a proposal for a research activity/ project that the applicant aspires to undertake during the stay with hbs (see above). Please do not forget to specify the exact time of your availability.

The curriculum vitae should be updated and precise, providing an overview of the educational background, previous professional experience, social and political engagement and publications on a maximum of two pages.

When designing your proposal, please keep in mind that there are topics that have been dealt with extensively in academia (confessionalism in Lebanon, party politics in Lebanon, Syrian/Palestinian refugees in Lebanon, ... ), which might render it difficult to contribute anything significantly new within the framework of an internship. We therefore recommend to go for more manageble topics.

Please make sure to send all your documents in English and that your resume is in accordance with international non-discrimination standards and does not contain a photo.

What benefits do we offer?

HBS offers interns to be part of an exciting and challenging work environment, and provides an opportunity to build a network of contacts with activists, development workers, and artists in Lebanon and the region. Interns will receive guidance and support during their research, and will be in a position to gain first-hand information on development, social and political issues from the hbs team and our partner organizations. Unfortunately no travel expenses can be covered. We do not organize for the accommodation of interns, but we will assist interns throughout their search. In exceptional cases, research and conceptual work performed for the benefit of our program may receive a modest remuneration.

When do you receive an answer?

Applications will be received all through the year; an acknowledgment of receiving the application will be emailed to the applicant and the application processed as soon as possible. Please note that we have a high number of applications.

How to apply

InternshipsPhoto: Stephan Röhl. Creative Commons License LogoThis image is licensed under Creative Commons License.

Send an email to info@lb.boell.org with the subject “application for internship”. Make sure to attach the cover letter, CV and project proposal in PDF format . Applications are not supposed to be directed to or address any particular person at hbs.

Interns Projects

Islam and Feminism, those two words seem like an oxymoron to most people. But it is not to everyone. Starting in the 90's a number of Islamic feminists from different parts of the world took the stage and made their struggle for women‘s emancipation public. This paper delves into the basic concept of Islamic Feminism and attempts to portray the counter-discourse as it is forming in Lebanon.

Cubebot checks out the Beirut Madinati campaign for the municipal elections in Lebanon.

Changing a crooked system from within might seem like a desperate effort, especially when the same political actors had been in power for over 20 years facilitating corruption and clientelism. Yet, it is a task that the civil platform Beirut Madinati took upon itself when they ran in the 2016 Lebanese municipal elections for the Beirut city council. Although they were not able to win a seat due to the Lebanese winner-takes-all electoral system, their high electoral success caused a massive uproar, also among the established political parties. For this research, a series of interviews has been conducted with members of Beirut Madinati in order to assess the reasons for their success, public reactions and considerations for their further proceedings.

8,331 - is the astonishing number of officially registered civil society organisations in the small state of Lebanon. From HIV prevention over democracy building to environmental protection, almost no topic remains unaddressed. However, from a closer look, the impact yielded by these groups in the compact state in the Middle East often remains somewhat restricted. On the example of gender equality – a topic fervently debated in Lebanon – this paper analyses the internal and external reasons behind this surprising discrepancy and stipulate thought about how to make the Lebanese civil society work more effectively.

The civil society movement during the garbage crisis in Beirut after July 2015.

When garbage started to pile up in the streets of Beirut in summer 2015, a new wave of civil society protests was initiated in the country. Thousands of Lebanese were protesting in the streets – against the garbage situation, corruption of the government, the failure of electing a president, sectarianism and many more issues connected to the crisis of the state and the waste management. More than half a year later, no final solution for the garbage has been found and the political situation has not changed. It is said that the civil society movement failed to put pressure on the government, but also the regime itself is made responsible for the lack of change. For many people it was hard to follow up with what was happening on the streets during the demonstrations and to understand who the protestors were and which goals they tried to achieve. This paper analyzes the dynamics of the movement and tries to explain why not much has changed so far and if there is any chance for civil society movements in Lebanon in the future.

The dilemma faced by the EU in its search for an effective policy with Lebanon

The European Union is compelled to define its role in Lebanon anew and needs to disperse tensions within the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). Is the policy’s focal point to be shared values or stability? Active policy development or non-interference? Perspectives unearthed through fieldwork in Lebanon.

“The Speaker of the House and the Bureau of the Parliament remind you, the parliamentarians, that the floor is now open for amendments”, - sounds of rustling paper resonate in the auditorium of Haigazian University. On this Sunday morning, the air is humming with concentrated whisper as well dressed youth deliberates on modifications for law proposals. 32 young parliamentarians from Tyr, Saida, Tripoli, Mount Lebanon and Beirut convened in Beirut on March 22nd to simulate a plenary session of the Lebanese National Assembly. For two months, the students aged between 15 and 18 years, dedicated their Saturdays to prepare themselves and their draft laws for this day’s plenary session.

Cover of the paper "Against all odds?

Comics, Hip-Hop, paintings, poems or festivals. What effect can art have on a society? How do artists interact with lebanese society and what problems do they face? Artists give insights to structures, aims and problems of the Beirut art scene.

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