Activism

English

Crises Trigger Creativity Exhibition now online

With the development of the Arab Spring across the neighboring Arab nations, such as in Syria and Egypt, and with the inescapable consequences and repercussions on the Lebanese political scene, a new wave of protests against the Lebanese politicians has arisen, particularly following the government’s failure to resolve the mounting garbage crisis.

One of the most interesting aspects of these demonstrations is the involvement of numerous Lebanese artists who are using the protests as a space to address their political views. For this purpose, they use  different kinds of artistic expressions, such as music, paintings, graffiti etc. in order to convey messages to a larger public and to attract a bigger number of protestors and activists. 

Lebanese hip-hop artists (and everybody else) rapping about corruption

Even though the diversity in Arabic-language hip-hop might make generalizations difficult, journalists seem to find it fairly easy to celebrate the music’s role in the perceived Arab march for Western democratic values. Titles such as “Is hip hop driving the Arab Spring?” from the BBC, and “Palestinians In Lebanon Find A Political Tool In Hip-Hop” from NPR, are indicative of the potential attributed to this musical genre.

By Muneira Hoballah

Where the “Good Guys” get their motivation from

There's little hope for an improvement of the Syrian situation. Nonetheless, there are civil society activists who are still working on non-violent resistance and democratic change. Sarah Schwahn conducted interviews with many of them to see what motivates them to continue.

By Sarah Schwahn

L’Amérique latine déploie ses mille couleurs pour le climat

Lima Climate Change Conference: Lebanese journalist Suzanne Baaklini reports on the thousands of activists from different countries demonstrating through the streets of Lima while negotiations are continuing slowly few kilometers away. Article in French.

By Suzanne Baaklini